CHANDIGARH,18.01.20
PGIMER commences training on “Management of Public Health Emergencies”

The Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, PGIMER Chandigarh in collaboration with National Institute of Health and Family Welfare, New Delhi is organising a two weeks training on “Management of Public Health Emergencies” for the district health officials of Punjab, Jammu & Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh from 20thJan to 01st Feb, 2020.The total number of 30 participants who will be attending the training.The objective of this training is to enhance the knowledge and skills of the district health officials for the preparedness of public health emergencies.The training is funded by NIHFW and the coordinator of the training is Dr PVM Lakshmi, Professor of Epidemiology, Department of Community medicine and School of Public Health,PGIMER, Chandigarh.

This training will cover various concepts of disaster management and will provide exposure to the participants with mock-drills and management exercises along with field visits to various units in Hospitals, Fire Station, School, National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) and Air Force Medical Services.

Public health emergencies can arise from a wide range of causes, including outbreaks of contagious, life-threatening disease, natural disasters, as well as chemical contamination of the environment and the release of radiation. In emergencies, large numbers of people may require medical attention, health care systems may be over-stretched, and public order may be threatened. India is especially vulnerable to natural disasters because of its unique geo-climatic conditions, having recurrent floods, droughts, cyclones, earthquakes, and landslides. Out of 36 States and Union Territories (UTs) in the country, 27 are disaster prone. 58.6% landmass is prone to earthquakes of moderate to very high intensity; 12% land is prone to flood and river erosion; out of 7,516 km coastline, 5,700 km is prone to cyclones and tsunamis; 68% of the cultivable land is vulnerable to drought, hilly areas are at risk from landslides and avalanches, and 15% of landmass is prone to landslides.Heavy rains have wreaked havoc in North India including in Himachal Pradesh, Jammu & Kashmir and Punjab. Earthquakes have also occurred in North India, however damage from earthquakes in the region has mostly occurred during large events originating in the Himalayas.

Being prone to such vulnerable situation the training of the district health officials has come very timely to enhance the knowledge and skills of the District health officers in the area of management of Public Health Emergencies, so that they will be able to manage and improve services in their districts.

===================================

2-Day National Roundtable Consultation on Best Practices of Tobacco Control in India Kick-starts at PGIMER Chandigarh

Best Practices of Tobacco Control in India to be Discussed and Compiled by Pan India Experts

A two-day National Roundtable Consultation on Best Practices of Tobacco Control in India will begin on 20th January 2020 at Hotel Shivalik View, Sector 17, Chandigarh. The event has been organized by Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, PGIMER in collaboration with the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. A “Roundtable Consultation on Best Practices of Tobacco Control in India – A step towards Tobacco Free India” is being organized under the broader umbrella of Resource Centre for Tobacco Control with national experts for coalition of best practices in tobacco control.

Experts from various institutes and organizations working in various domains of tobacco control will be taking part in the consultation. These include Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India, The International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, New Delhi, Public Health Foundation of India, Vital Strategies, Rajasthan Cancer Foundation, HRIDAY, Centre for Public Policy Research- Kerala, Generation Saviour Association - Punjab and various civil society groups.

Since the introduction of the National Tobacco Control Program (NTCP), there have been several operational challenges at national and sub-national levels. The tobacco control fraternity have been making tremendous efforts in containing the tobacco epidemic through policy implementation and executing innovations in different domains of tobacco control. Due to these initiatives, India witnessed a six-point relative reduction in tobacco use in Global Adult Tobacco Survey-2. However, the best practices and innovations in the area of tobacco control go unnoticed due to lack of their formal documentation.

Best practices in spheres ranging from implementation of National Tobacco Control Program me, tobacco economics, tobacco cessation, interventions for youth, coalition building, role of civil society groups, integration with other national health programmes, behavior strategies through gender perspective and tobacco industry interference will be discussed. Following this, a compendium of best practices in tobacco control in India shall be formally prepared for wider dissemination and learning.